When I think of graphics, my mind’s eye sees bold color and strong lines within a very defined space. Graphics seem to focus us down to just what the artist wants us to see. They’re not really as much about the viewer’s interpretation of the work as how successfully the artist is at winning the viewer over to his viewpoint. I suppose that’s why those who work in advertising are considered “graphic” artists.

A couple of these pieces are about blurring the distinction between photography and other graphic arts. Struggle does this for me. It began as a close-up shot of grass and clover in our yard last spring. It’s been highly manipulated and most obviously textured with a painting technique. But, what I like most about the final product is not that it looks like a painting. . .but when printed, it looks like a photograph of a painting. Is it a painting? Clearly not. Is it a photograph? Well, sort of.

And that’s basically the process with all of my work. I’ve always felt that a person should heed accepted rules of photography.. .until they get in the way.


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